According to a report from PageFair and Adobe, ad blockage in the U.S. resulted in an estimated $5.8 billion in blocked revenue during 2014. It’s expected to cost $10.7 billion this year and $20.3 billion in 2016.


Ad blocking is a hot topic in the marketing world, and this month, things grew even more controversial. Apple now permits apps that block ads for iPhones and iPads. Just search “ad blocking” in Google News, and countless articles about the hot controversy pop up. While this may delight everyday Internet navigators, publishers are, understandably, less than thrilled. An Oregon live article even describes it as a “looming apocalypse for ad-dependent publishers.”

ABC News points out that Apple’s move “threatens the livelihood of websites and publishers that depend heavily on advertising revenue — companies like Google, Hulu and The New York Times.”

With the release of iOS 9, developers can now create ad-blocking software for Apple’s Safari. These apps became so successful that even the creators of apps themselves have been having second thoughts. In fact, Marco Arment created the app “Peace” which made its way to the top of the paid app list on iTunes, only to take it down. In a blog post last week, Arment explained his reasoning:

“Achieving this much success with Peace just doesn’t feel good, which I didn’t anticipate, but probably should have. Ad blockers come with an important asterisk: while they do benefit a ton of people in major ways, they also hurt some, including many who don’t deserve the hit.”

A report from Adobe and Page Fair revealed the following:

  • Ad blocking grew by 41% globally in the last 12 months, increasing to 198 million monthly active users for the major browsers that block ads.
  • Ad blockage in the U.S. resulted in an estimated $5.8 billion in blocked revenue during 2014.
  • Ad blockage is expected to cost $10.7 billion this year and $20.3 billion in 2016.